Safe Driving Tips

Safe Driving

  • Always wear your seat belt — and make sure all passengers buckle up, too.
  • Adjust your car’s headrest to a height behind your head — not your neck — to minimize whiplash in case you’re in an accident.
  • Never try to fit more people in the car than you have seat belts for them to use.
  • Obey the speed limits. Excess speed is one of the main causes of car accidents.
  • Don’t run red lights. When the light turns green, make sure the intersection clears before you go.
  • Use your turn signal to indicate your intention to turn or to change lanes. Turn it on to give the cars behind you enough time to react before you take the action. Also, make sure the signal turns off after you have completed the action.
  • Don’t drive like you own the road; drive like you own the car.
  • Make sure your windshield is clean.
  • Make sure your car has gas in it. Don’t ride around with the gauge on empty — who knows where you might get stranded.
  • Make sure your cellphone/smartphone is fully charged.
  • Don’t drink and drive, and don’t ride with anyone who has been drinking. Call a relative or friend to take you home if you need a ride.
  • Don’t take drugs or drive if you have taken any. Don’t ride with anyone who has been using drugs.
  • Even some over-the-counter drugs can make you drowsy. Check labels for warnings.
  • Don’t blast the radio so loud you can’t hear sirens, horns and other warning noises.
  • Don’t drive with small children or even small adult friends as passengers in a front seat with a passenger-side air bag. They should be buckled up in the back seat.
  • Don’t talk on your cellphone, send text messages, put on makeup, comb your hair or eat while driving.
  • If you need to make a call, pull off the road to a safe spot and park.
  • Don’t leave your car in cruise control when you’re driving late at night or when you’re tired.
  • Don’t fiddle with the radio while you are driving. Wait until you can pull over and stop.
  • Maintain your car and use good quality tires that are inflated to the right pressure. Bald tires, a slipping transmission or a hesitant engine could lead to accidents.
  • Have a designated driver when going out for a night on the town with friends. This person does not drink and has the responsibility of getting people home safely. Drinking and driving DO NOT MIX.
  • Watch out for potholes, especially after bad weather.
  • Be on the lookout for motorcycles, bikes and pedestrians.
  • When driving to a new place, get complete directions before you go. Figure out what exits you need to take beforehand.
  • When driving in winter weather, make sure you have emergency road supplies, including salt/sand, a shovel, flares, a blanket, gloves and hat and a first aid kit.
  • If your car has been parked outside during a snowstorm, check the exhaust pipes to make sure they are clear before starting the car. Also, check if you back up into a snowbank. This helps to avoid exhaust fumes from entering the car.